0333 3010056 info@lytes.co.uk

Driving Instructor Melton Mowbray


 

DRIVING INSTRUCTOR MELTON MOWBRAY

Driving Instructor Melton Mowbray

Passing your driving test is a fantastic experience. However, you need to be safe. Here’s a tip to stay safe on the roads after your driving lessons have finished and you are driving on your own.

Take a look at the photo and see if you can see the risk. If you look closely you will see this sign:

 

 

Driving School Melton Mowbray

 

The sign shows that the road we are on goes sharp left. However, it can be easy to miss the sign and continue ahead which means we are crossing the path of vehicles coming from the left of the photo. This could prove to be very dangerous. Make sure you practice looking for signs on your driving lessons and use them to plan ahead.

 


Driving Schools Melton Mowbray


 

Driving Schools Melton Mowbray

Driving Schools Melton Mowbray

 

Driving lessons Melton Mowbray

Driving Schools Melton Mowbray discuss Hidden dips and Dead Ground.

Where the road surface drops away so you can’t see all the tarmac in front of you is know as “Dead Ground” or “Hidden Dips”.
The risk is there is someone or something in the dip that you can’t see so you don’t know what you are driving into.
Don’t even consider overtaking until you can see all the road. Know what’s behind you in case you need to stop and adjust your speed as necessary. There are big risks associated with hidden dips, so, stay safe and be patient.

Forward planning and recognising risks are what makes us safe drivers.

 


Driving Advice


Driving Advice

Driving Advice

 

Driving Advice from Lytes Driving School

When driving on gravel your abs (anti-lock braking system) could actually make your car take longer to stop.

This is because without abs if the brakes lock up it will build up a wedge of gravel in front of the tyre, this acts as a ramp and will help stop the car. However, with abs fitted the system won’t allow the wheels to lock, so no wedge of gravel is built up. The abs will just cut in and chatter away, but the car may continue to move forwards and take longer to stop.

 


Driving in Bright Sun


 

Driving in Bright Sun

Driving in Bright Sun

 

Driving in Bright Sun

 

It’s great when the weather is warm and sunny but it brings with it signficant risks when driving. The bright sun can make visability poor due to heat haze and reflections. We have all witnessed the “mirage of water” on the road. In the desert it might fool you into thinking that a cool drink is nearby. However, when driving, it restricts your view of the road ahead.

The sun reflecting on your dashboard can mean that you just see a reflection of the dashboard on the inside of your windscreen and not the road ahead. This can be a “Wee Bit” dangerous, I’m sure you agree.

Driving from bright sunshine into the shadow created by overhanging trees can be like driving into an un-lit tunnel not knowing what is in front of you. For all you know there could be a herd of Wilderbeast grazing ahead. OK, that’s unlikely but you get the point.

Recognised the risk, adjust your speed accordingly and be prepared to stop.

One important aspect of becoming a good driver is to recognised when others coming towards you will have a poor view. For example, you may be emerging from the “Tunnel of Trees” and see someone coming towards you. You could anticipate that they may have a poor view of you. Or you may have the sun behind you, meaning they are looking directly into the sun.

 


Should I Use Suncream When Driving?


 

Should I Use Suncream When Driving?

Should I Use Suncream When Driving?

Driving Lessons Melton Mowbray

 

We all know about the dangers of skin exposed to the sun, but, what about when you are in the car?

Studies of regular drivers have shown that the side of the face and arm on the outer side of the car have significantly more micro skin damage than the non-exposed side. This is because the UV light still penetrates the windows and damages our delicate skin.

The windscreen of the car is laminated and made up of different layers to prevent it shattering if hit by a stone. There is a layer of UV protection built into the windscreen but this is to protect the plastic layers from deteriorating over time. It may offer some protection to us, but, is not there primarily to protect us. The side windows won’t usually have UV protection in them.

So, the question was “Should I Use Suncream When Driving?”

YEP.

Our advice is
1   Use a sun cream of at least factor 30.
2  Wear long sleeves.
3  Keep the windows up.
4  Wear sunglasses with UVA and UVB protection
5  Wear a hat.

For more tips and driving advice click here

 


Your Driving Test


Your Driving Test

Your Driving Test

Your Driving Test

 

Your Driving Test

When you go for your driving test you should be well prepared and have had lots of practice. You will have encountered meeting other traffic on many occasions during your driving lessons and dealt with them safely.

However, on driving test it can be easy to do something that you would not normally do. Many candidates have failed their driving test because they continued into a meeting situation where they should have waited.

When you encounter a meeting situation and think “I think it’s ok to keep going” it is time to rethink. It may well be ok to continue but a moments thought could well save your test. Practice this thought process with your driving instructor.